It has been almost a year since the Indian government arrested Vivek Raghuvanshi, a longtime freelancer journalist with Defense News, with officials having declined to provide information about his safety, legal representation and allegations.

The government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi has cracked down on the freedom of the press for several years, and reporters are in danger of “physical attacks, mob violence, and violent demonstrations,” according to the Committee to Protect Journalists. CPJ recently released a warning to journalists in India amid Modi’s reelection campaign.

“The evolving nature of these press-related attacks necessitates heightened attention and proactive measures to safeguard journalistic integrity and ensure the free flow of information, particularly in politically charged environments,” the organization wrote in March.

The Indian Express reported a year ago that India’s Central Bureau of Investigation arrested Raghuvanshi and accused him of espionage. The newspaper quoted a CBI spokesperson, who said the bureau had conducted multiple searches.

“We again call for the immediate release of freelance reporter Vivek Raghuvanshi following his arrest in India in May 2023,” said Cary O’Reilly, senior managing editor for emerging markets at Sightline Media Group. “We have repeatedly asked for information on his case and have heard nothing. The government of India must provide the public with information about Vivek’s case.”

“In our long relationship with Vivek, we have always found him to be a person of deep integrity, trusted by his colleagues and by his readers in the defense industry,” O’Reilly added. “One year later, Sightline has still seen no evidence to substantiate these charges.”

Sightline Media Group is an independent, for-profit U.S. media company with correspondents around the world. It is not affiliated with the U.S. government.

Share:
More In Global
Opinion
Unleash the Space Force
Numbers outlining China's military space prowess are understandably alarming, but they don’t tell the whole story, Todd Harrison argues in an op-ed.