Advertisement

You will be redirected to the page you want to view in  seconds.

GTY 480678383 A DEF POL MIL USA VA
Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel encourages caution in conducting cyber war. (Mark Wilson / Getty Images)

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said Friday that the Pentagon will exercise restraint in use of its cyber warfare capabilities and urged other countries to do the same.

“The United States does not seek to militarize cyberspace,” Hagel said in remarks at a ceremony to mark the retirement of Army Gen. Keith Alexander, who headed both the civilian National Security Agency and the Pentagon’s Cyber Command.

Alexander headed the agency during a time of unprecedented public criticism following disclosures by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden that revealed the government’s collection of “metadata.”

Alexander “led NSA through one of the most challenging periods in its history,” Hagel said. “And he did so with a fierce, but necessary determination to develop and protect tools vital to our national security.”

Hagel pledged to be open with the public as the Pentagon pressed ahead with efforts to develop its cyber capabilities.

“We will continue to engage in a more open dialogue with the American public,” Hagel said in remarks at Fort Meade, Md., where the NSA and Cyber Command are headquartered.

In that spirit, Hagel pointed out that the ceremony was the first live broadcast from the headquarters of the secretive agency.

The Pentagon has developed both offensive and defensive capabilities in cyber space, but Hagel said it will be cautious in how those capabilities are employed.

The Pentagon “will maintain an approach of restraint to any cyber operations outside of U.S. government networks,” Hagel said. “We are urging other nations to do the same.”

The Pentagon has increased spending for cyber operations, and Cyber Command expects to have a force of 6,000 warriors by 2016.

Adm. Michael Rogers has been chosen by the White House to replace Alexander as head of both agencies.

Follow @jimmichaels on Twitter.

More In C4ISRNET

More from this channel

  1. An MC-12 Liberty lands after a surveillance mission at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan. Tech. Sgt. Jeromy K. Cross/Air Force

    Air Force's MC-12 mission ends in Afghanistan

    After more than 200,000 hours of surveillance, ISR squadron is done.

    • 4:28 PM
  2. Luke Devore, an Army Research Labs contractor with Design Interactive, demonstrates the Augmented Reality sand table on Sept. 23 during Modern Day Marine Expo at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Va. Rob Curtis / Staff

    Microsoft's Kinect aids in 'augmented reality sand' mapping tool

    Video game technology has aided researchers in creating realistic 3-D battlespace maps using a simple sand box.

    • 4:38 PM
  3. Airbus Defense and Space has submitted an application for civil certification of its Atlante UAV to the European Aviation Safety Agency. Roberto Molinos/Airbus

    Airbus seeks first-of-its-kind European UAV certification

    The application calls for a new process for the European Aviation Safety Agency.

    • 4:05 PM
  4. BAE to buy US cyber service provider

    The acquisition of SilverSky enhances BAE's Applied Intelligence commercial cyber security business, company says.

    • 4:57 PM
  5. NGA awards 5 Map of the World contracts

    Companies will aid in providing data links, blending data from multiple sources and developing a framework for user-generated content.

    • 4:46 PM
  6. Air Force program to enhance mission execution

    The Mission Awareness for Mission Assurance program will analyze network traffic flows to aid in prioritizing functions.

    • 3:13 PM

Daily intelligence on C4ISR and networks

There's no better way to know what's going on every day in areas like UAS and sensors, GEOINT, C2 and communications, cyber, mobility and defense IT, than to sign up for our daily C4ISRNET newsletters. The news will come right to your inbox, along with commentary and insight from our lineup of senior-level bloggers.

Sign up is easy and quick.