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Robert J. Carey, the Defense Department's deputy CIO, is leaving the post.
Robert J. Carey, the Defense Department's deputy CIO, is leaving the post. ()

The Defense Department’s Deputy CIO Rob Carey announced March 26 that he will step down from his Pentagon post at the end of the week, according to published reports.

Carey has held several high-level DoD positions, including three years as Navy CIO before he became deputy DOD CIO in October 2010.

“It’s time,” Carey said in an email to friends and colleagues, according to Federal News Radio. “It has been a privilege and honor to serve you, the department and the nation as I have. While my civilian career was interrupted twice by mobilizations, once for Operation Desert Shield/Storm and then a few years ago by Operation Iraqi Freedom, I considered it an honor to be able to wear the cloth of the nation during a time of crisis.”

Carey also serves as co-chairman of the CIO Council's Information Security and Identity Management Committee. At the Pentagon, he has focused on issues related to cybersecurity, enterprise architecture and IT standardization and consolidation.

There are no firm plans for where he will head next, but Carey hinted that he would continue to work on national security issues after he retires from DOD on March 28.

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